Lab #10

Part One

A study found that people on Facebook create their ideal selves and the image of a more positive life than reality on this platform (Stronge). We share what we want people to see instead of reality. It’s like posting that selfie you took when you had a good hair day instead of posting that picture you took three weeks ago with the biggest pimple on your forehead to show your friend. When I asked Ms. Finch about the human nature to share on social media, she said, “we do like to flaunt ourselves, put ourselves forward and post the best picture and the best selfie. We like to share because we think we have something important to contribute … we’re just sharing the positive stuff, which reinforces how we feel about ourselves.” We like to talk about ourselves. No doubt about that and we devote approximately 30%-40% of all our speech about ourselves. Online, this percentage increases to about 80%. It’s just like saying “me, me, me, oh me again and wait, me with my best friend” all over your Twitter account. Similarly, 62% of people said they feel better about themselves when others reacted positively to what they posted on social media. We need social media to share the good things in our life and receive positive feedback on it. Many people are guilty of posting those “workout” photos when they haven’t even broken a sweat in their workout gear just to show they’re “fit”. Stina Sanders, a London-based model, started posting real pictures on Instagram and as a consequence, she lost thousands of followers. She shared pictures that weren’t glamorous but instead, portrayed real life. Rather than creating a perfect life through her social media, she showed the world her real life like removing her moustache and getting a colonoscopy. Finding the balance between real life and social media can sometimes be difficult.

A study found that people on Facebook create their ideal selves and the image of a more positive life than reality on this platform (Stronge). It’s like posting that selfie you took when you had a good hair day instead of posting that picture with the biggest pimple on your forehead. When I asked Ms. Finch about the human nature to share on social media, she said, “we like to share because we think we have something important to contribute.” We devote approximately 30%-40% of all our speech about ourselves. Online, this percentage increases to about 80%. It’s just like saying “me, me, me, oh me again and wait, me with my best friend” all over your Twitter account. Similarly, 62% of people said they feel better about themselves when others reacted positively to what they posted on social media. Stina Sanders, a London-based model, started posting real pictures on Instagram and as a consequence, she lost thousands of followers. Rather than creating a perfect life through her social media, she showed the world her real life like removing her moustache and getting a colonoscopy. 

Part Two

Thinking back to that shameful day, I spent at least two hours on social media. With nothing else to do, it was a nice distraction from my own life. Seeing Justin Bieber’s new puppy and fantasizing over Kylie Jenner’s new lipsticks used minutes that could have been spent on taking a nice walk or spending time with my family. I’ve spent so much time on these platforms that it has become alarming. Living through others through Snapchat and Instagram is not how life should be spent. Sure, I learn about current events through Twitter and talk to my distant cousins on Snapchat but being too attached is detrimental. I don’t want to be stuck in this trap. Maybe, I just can’t give it up because I’m unhappy with my own life and facing this fact requires snapping out of it.

Part Three

  1. New day, new filters. As I opened the infamous app, I held down on my face and scrolled until I found the perfect filter.
  2. 90% of young adults between the ages of 18 and 29 use social media. Not very surprising, I know.
  3. 234. You must be wondering why this number is significant. It’s not. But it’s the number of people I follow on Instagram; a number that I’ve memorized.
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