Reading Response #11

  1. I really enjoyed the process of working on the article. I have never worked on a piece for this long and it was nice to go through the steps of brainstorming and then rewriting drafts. This process taught me to choose the words that I am writing carefully. There should be a thought process as to why you wrote what you did. I also learned that less is more. Before this class, I thought it was more important to provide all the details but I learned that you can communicate what you are trying to say with one sentence rather than three sentences filled with “fluff”. In terms of practices of writing, rewriting will definitely stick with me. It’s so important to constantly try and improve what you have written. What I will take away from this class is to always write in my style. I may not be the best writer but my style and voice are important and I should stay true to them.
  2. I think analogies will become useful in my future writing. I never truly understood what an analogy was until this class. This technique has resonated with me because they’re fun to write and they are very efficient at getting your point across. They make everything easier to understand. I also think ethical arguments are important. They can make all the difference in if the reader believes what you are saying.
  3. My writing has improved since I was able to learn numerous new techniques. They are very useful tools and are fundamental for writing. I also think my writing improved by learning how to take out what is unnecessary. Writing strong sentences is an essential skill. I believe that this is the only English class at Dawson where I learned how to write and improved on it. I really enjoyed the progression of writing the article and the freedom we had to write it. In every other English course, I was assigned the same essay over and over and it was refreshing to write on my own in this class.
  4. I will continue to work on writing and incorporating imagery. This is still one of my weaknesses and I would like to improve on it.
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Lab #11

Part One

  1. Snap(chat) out of it
  2. Know Your (Insta)Worth
  3. Social Media: Why it could be taking over your life
  4. Your Brain Loves Social Media
  5. How to Know You’ve Reached the End of Your Feed
  6. Every Post Has a Silver Lining
  7. Social Media Spell
  8. Why do Our Brains Like Social Media?
  9. Are You Addicted to Social Media?

Part Two

Why couldn’t I give up social media for a day?

Social media has been a part of my life since I was 14 years old when my mother finally allowed me to get Facebook.

Simple. It’s neuroscience.

Going on social media can alter the levels of oxytocin in our brains.

Not only do our brains chemically feel good when we double tap someone’s Instagram picture but so does that person’s.

We post with reason and a team of researchers led by Dar Meshi discovered why we post on Facebook by using brain-imaging data.

People approve and so we are inclined to continue to do what we’re doing.

We keep posting (hello, post limit) and the more time people spend on Facebook, the more they believed that others were happier and generally had better lives than them (Stronge).

You can even find me (and I’m sure many others) scrolling through Instagram or snapchatting in the nightclub.

I’m sure I am not the only one that compares my life to others on social media.

All it takes is someone’s cute, flawless selfie for you to feel insecure.

But Photoshop exists so what we perceive on these sites isn’t always true.

How many times have you heard your friend tell you she wishes that she could be as positive and healthy as her favourite Instagrammer?

People on Facebook create their ideal selves and the image of a more positive life than reality on this platform (Stronge).

 

Lab #10

Part One

A study found that people on Facebook create their ideal selves and the image of a more positive life than reality on this platform (Stronge). We share what we want people to see instead of reality. It’s like posting that selfie you took when you had a good hair day instead of posting that picture you took three weeks ago with the biggest pimple on your forehead to show your friend. When I asked Ms. Finch about the human nature to share on social media, she said, “we do like to flaunt ourselves, put ourselves forward and post the best picture and the best selfie. We like to share because we think we have something important to contribute … we’re just sharing the positive stuff, which reinforces how we feel about ourselves.” We like to talk about ourselves. No doubt about that and we devote approximately 30%-40% of all our speech about ourselves. Online, this percentage increases to about 80%. It’s just like saying “me, me, me, oh me again and wait, me with my best friend” all over your Twitter account. Similarly, 62% of people said they feel better about themselves when others reacted positively to what they posted on social media. We need social media to share the good things in our life and receive positive feedback on it. Many people are guilty of posting those “workout” photos when they haven’t even broken a sweat in their workout gear just to show they’re “fit”. Stina Sanders, a London-based model, started posting real pictures on Instagram and as a consequence, she lost thousands of followers. She shared pictures that weren’t glamorous but instead, portrayed real life. Rather than creating a perfect life through her social media, she showed the world her real life like removing her moustache and getting a colonoscopy. Finding the balance between real life and social media can sometimes be difficult.

A study found that people on Facebook create their ideal selves and the image of a more positive life than reality on this platform (Stronge). It’s like posting that selfie you took when you had a good hair day instead of posting that picture with the biggest pimple on your forehead. When I asked Ms. Finch about the human nature to share on social media, she said, “we like to share because we think we have something important to contribute.” We devote approximately 30%-40% of all our speech about ourselves. Online, this percentage increases to about 80%. It’s just like saying “me, me, me, oh me again and wait, me with my best friend” all over your Twitter account. Similarly, 62% of people said they feel better about themselves when others reacted positively to what they posted on social media. Stina Sanders, a London-based model, started posting real pictures on Instagram and as a consequence, she lost thousands of followers. Rather than creating a perfect life through her social media, she showed the world her real life like removing her moustache and getting a colonoscopy. 

Part Two

Thinking back to that shameful day, I spent at least two hours on social media. With nothing else to do, it was a nice distraction from my own life. Seeing Justin Bieber’s new puppy and fantasizing over Kylie Jenner’s new lipsticks used minutes that could have been spent on taking a nice walk or spending time with my family. I’ve spent so much time on these platforms that it has become alarming. Living through others through Snapchat and Instagram is not how life should be spent. Sure, I learn about current events through Twitter and talk to my distant cousins on Snapchat but being too attached is detrimental. I don’t want to be stuck in this trap. Maybe, I just can’t give it up because I’m unhappy with my own life and facing this fact requires snapping out of it.

Part Three

  1. New day, new filters. As I opened the infamous app, I held down on my face and scrolled until I found the perfect filter.
  2. 90% of young adults between the ages of 18 and 29 use social media. Not very surprising, I know.
  3. 234. You must be wondering why this number is significant. It’s not. But it’s the number of people I follow on Instagram; a number that I’ve memorized.

Reading Response #9, comments on Laurel Walfish’s second draft

  1. We have become desensitized to degrading women. I’m not sure this is the main point but it is what I get from reading your opening.
  2. Inner beauty is more important than physical beauty.
  3. I really liked your opening. It caught my attention and made me want to keep reading because I had never thought about how many songs there really are about butts. I also like your voice. It’s funny and energetic. It is genuine and not boring. It feels as though you’re talking to one of your friends. There are a lot of funny lines like “asspect” and “a moment on my lips will last a lifetime on my hips”. I also like the research on fat distribution. I didn’t know that having a naturally bigger butt has health benefits. I also enjoyed how you incorporated scientific research into your article. It’s evenly spread out and easy to understand.
  4. I feel that perhaps you can add a few analogies to explain the scientific concepts. As a science student, I know what an allele is but some people do not know. I also think that adding some statistics would be cool for people to read about (if there are any).
  5. I like the title. I think it really captures the idea of the article and it’s funny.

Lab #9

Part 1:

-My audience is teenagers that use social media or have been on social media before.

-The purpose of my article is to make people more aware of how social media can become an addiction and also how it affects our brain.

Part 2:

Exposition: trying to give up social media but failing

Complication: Why couldn’t I give it up?

Because of that: brain likes using social media and we feel pleasure (oxytocin)

Because of that: social comparison

Because of that: Essena O’Neill and Stina Sanders approached social media in different ways (fake reality on social media)

Because of that: addiction is real

Because of that: Social media sites use algorithms to make it more addictive

Climax: imagine losing track of time at a concert because of social media

Denouement: more aware of my social media habits, also aware about addiction

Part 4:

Imagine you’ve dreamt about attending your favourite singer’s concert every day. You start a countdown on your phone, checking each time to see how many minutes remain until you can breathe the same air as them. And finally, the day has arrived. You are ecstatic to be in the same room as them. You’re dressed in your best clothes that you picked out a week ago and you’re ready to sing so loudly that you’ll lose your voice by the end of the night. Three, two, one… They rise onto the stage and the crowd roars like a race car revving up its engine. Holy $%&#! You grab your phone and quickly start filming. You send a snap to your friend green with envy. But, you don’t stop there. You keep taking videos for your Snapchat story. OMG, that video is so insta-worthy. Soon enough, that annoying “Cannot Take Photo” message pops up because you don’t have enough storage. Darn, you’re going to miss the finale. “Thank you so much for an amazing night! You guys rock”, they say as they run off the stage. You missed the entire concert because you were too busy posting and now it’s over. You know that next concert, you’re not bringing your phone.

 

Lab #8

Part One

1-Why couldn’t I give up social media for a day?

2- Why do I like social media?

Do I spend too much time on it?

Why do I compare myself to others on social media?

What is social comparison?

Why do we share things on social media?

What is addiction?

Part Two:

-my experience of attempting to give up social media (opening)

-imagine: being at a restaurant with friends and spending the entire night on Instagram

-hanging out with friends and everyone is scrolling through social media instead of talking

-snapchatting the person beside you vs having face-to-face conversations

-imagine: finding out your favorite celebrity has edited all their pictures to look perfect

-imagine: going to your favorite singer’s concert and snapchatting your experience

 

 

Lab #6

Step one:

9:17 a.m. Cozied up in bed with my warm duvet, I opened my eyes to be blinded by the sun. I reached over and grabbed my favorite little device. I pressed down on the power button and my phone lit up. My phone’s brightness caused me to squint as I tapped in the four numbers that would unlock a new world to me. But this online world was going to disappear. I held down on each app icon until it started shaking like an earthquake and then, I pressed those little x icons. Goodbye “tap to like” Instagram, Snapchat geofilters, Facebook statuses and retweets on Twitter. I was giving up social media. Why, you may ask. Well, I felt that I was too caught up in the online world. I spent too much time on those apps and felt like I needed to be more present in my life. But I failed. After four hours of binge watching the O.C., my fingers quickly unlocked my phone and found their way to the App store. One by one, the apps were redownloaded and with that, my plan was gone. I was so frustrated and disappointed. I couldn’t give up social media for a single day. Why couldn’t I give up four wee apps?

Step Three:

Imagine you’re sitting in class. You’re a few minutes early and you have nothing to do. You can smell the body odors of the previous people in class. It isn’t a pleasant scent. You take out an apple and begin crunching into the fruit. You can hear yourself chewing the McIntosh and so can everyone else you conclude. You sit impatiently for a few seconds feeling bored so you turn to your phone. Your eyes gaze down towards the screen and you click on the little blue bird app, Twitter. You start scrolling through endless tweets and retweets until you realize that the hushed whispers have stopped and class has begun. By the time you realize, it’s too late. The teacher has called on you to put away your device and you feel your face turning beet red. You’re embarrassed because you’ve just been called out. Now, imagine if you hadn’t gone on Twitter and just sat there eating your apple. It would’ve saved you some humiliation. Most often, we get so caught up in the social media realm that we don’t see what’s in front of us. We’re too busy on social media to be present nowadays. How many times have you had to repeat what you said because your friend was busy snapping her boyfriend or typing her latest Instagram caption? We’ve become so attached to something that doesn’t even physically exist.

Step Four:

These days, everyone is so caught up with getting likes to validate themselves. It is like having a conversation with someone and each time they speak, they finish with “don’t you agree?”. Every time you agree, it is as if you “liked” what they were saying. You have boosted their self-confidence and given them the feeling that they are validated. Once you’ve agreed with them 100 times, there’s no chance they’ll take back what they said. They’ve reached their goal of “100 likes”. Getting likes translates to being accepted by others because they have “liked” what you have posted. People are interested in your life which makes you feel good.